An integral part of learning the Alexander Technique is to practise this resting balancing state. In semi-supine we are encouraging the back muscles to coordinate so that deeply held tensions can start to let go.

The intervertebral disks in our spine are subject to pressure during the day as our body weight pushes down. Cartilage and fluid in the disks are squeezed out into surrounding body tissues, as a result our stature shortens.

When the pressure on the disks is taken away, the disks have the ability to reabsorb fluids so, lying down in semi-supine actively helps the spine to plump up again.

Chronic neck pain is a difficult condition to manage and additional approaches are needed, particularly ones that have a strong self-care basis. Read about this in a new study published in the Annals of Internal Medicine.

Published research on the Alexander Technique: My recommendations

More and more research is being done on the Alexander Technique. Here are links to a few academic papers which I particularly recommend: Lighten Up: Specific Postural Instructions Affect Axial Rigidity and Step Initiation in Patients With Parkinson’s Disease Increased dynamic regulation of postural tone through Alexander Technique training Neuromechanical interference of posture on movement: […]

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Smart Phone! Smart Posture? My thoughts…

Text Neck – A problem of the modern age Text neck, or tech neck is the term used to describe the pain and damage caused to the neck, back and spine from constantly looking down at electronic devices. It is one of the most common causes of back pain and headaches and is an epidemic […]

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How time shapes your posture… and how the Alexander Technique can help

Our body is shaped by how we use it over time. Bad postural habits that have developed over many years can feel normal until pain alerts us that something is not quite right. For instance you might have heard of “forward head posture” or “computer-neck” as way of describing the habitual hunching in front of […]

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Sitting on a Saddle Seat

Do you know why the incidence of back pain in tribal people is very low? They don’t tend to sit in chairs for long hours. Sitting Support Most people sit slumped back into the chair seat maybe misguidedly thinking that in doing so they are supporting their back. In fact they are often sitting on […]

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